A Chat With Nicky Romero Backstage At Electric Zoo

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A Chat With Nicky Romero Backstage At Electric Zoo

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Rukes

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Nicky Romero needs little introduction to the EDM culture fan. The Dutch born DJ/producer has seen his career jump to new heights within the past few years. He’s definitely come a long way since his first break producing his own mix of David Guetta’s “When Love Takes Over.”

The release of “My Friend” back in 2010 was his jump up to the next level. The track for Spinnin’ Records placed 4th overall on the Beatport top 100 download chart and went straight to the # 1 spot on Dutch portal Dance–Tunes. A few more successes piled on and now Nicky’s tour schedule has him bouncing around the world as one of the most sought after DJ/producers of right now. Ultra Music Festival during WMC, as well as sets at EDC NYC and Vegas, Tomorrowland and now this past weekend Electric Zoo, which is where I got the chance to sit backstage with the man for a few minutes for a chat as he was eating a banana. Which may or may not have been given to him by Dada Life.

I always try and adjust myself to the crowd because every festival kind of has there own vibe… And every state has their favorite tunes.

So main stage at electric zoo this year very exciting stuff I’m sure, how was the crowd and vibe up there?

The crowd was really amazing. The main stage here feels like it's huge but at the same time is really intimate. The people are so much connected to you that you feel that you are like one of the people out in the crowd and that’s a unique thing that only Electric Zoo has, if you ask me.

That’s a great thing to hear considering this is a hometown festival. So that was a pretty dirty set you just dropped on us (laughs). Do you tend to prepare your mixes beforehand and have tracks in your mind you know you're going to play or do you prefer to just wing it and work off of the crowd?

It depends ya know, I mean I always prepare my music but I always try and adjust myself to the crowd because every festival kind of has there own vibe, ya know. And every state has their favorite tunes so I think it’s important that if you’re on stage that you read peoples minds or read peoples reactions to the music and adjust yourself to that. So I make sure I always have tons of music with me so I can select whatever I think is good.

romero

I don’t want to think of music as commercialized or commercial EDM…it doesn’t feel like America got commercialized. For me, music is just music.

You obviously travel all around the world and see all different places. I'm curious what makes New York special to you?

I love New York because there is so much to see here. When I have a day off in NYC I always try and see everything, ya know, for us from Europe there is so much history here and I like to go and see places like the Empire State Building, the Statue of Liberty, I definitely like to sight see. Honest to god, going to see ground zero was also really impressive. I love the culture here, everybody is so free and everybody lets everyone else live and do his or her thing and I think that’s something we can definitely learn from back in Europe.

Now in terms of actually playing your shows in NYC, what are some of your favorite clubs in town?

There are many good places here and I can only mention on the ones I’ve played at of course but I like Lavo, I like Pacha, Avenue. I definitely like the smaller rooms but I think Pacha is really really good. I definitely look forward to seeing more places and playing shows at other clubs. Ya know, tonight I have off and I’m pretty sure I’m going to see everything (laughs).

When you hear of a legendary group such as, Above and Beyond, expressing their concern about the commercialization of dance music in America and its effects on the scene in America and around the world, how does that make you feel?

To be honest, I don’t want to think of music as commercialized or commercial EDM, ya know, music is music and I don’t like to think in boxes. So for me it doesn’t feel like America got commercialized, um, I mean there is a lot of great music here and a lot of great music produced here and for me I don’t really like to say that something is commercial. For me, music is just music.

That’s a good perspective. Thanks again for your time.

Anytime, thanks guys.