EDM Feature - Catching Up With God’s Kitchen Resident Paul Thomas

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The UK’s Paul Thomas has been delivering a wide range of musical productions and DJ sets at clubs/festivals worldwide. The God’s Kitchen resident always seems to be on the move, traveling the globe from China to Paris to Brazil. With releases on Global Underground and Toolroom Records under his belt, Thomas is ready to kick off this summer season in a big way. I caught up with him as he shared his thoughts on his new record label, the Indian EDM scene and how dance music plays in with our emotions.

You’re playing in India on Friday and you’ve been there several times before. Tell us what is it about India and the dance music space that keeps catching your attention?

Well what I like about India is that the music is very unique. The scene has been blowing up for the past couple of years, just like it has in the United States. However, out there it seems like it’s exploding more on the underground scale, rather than an “EDM” thing. You can get away a lot more musically in India than you can in other countries. At a festival like, Sunburn in Goa, I played a deep and tech influenced set for nearly five hundred people and that was a great experience for me.

Do you change up your sets every time you visit a different country to cater to what’s popular out there/culture? How different are your sets from something you would play at the Avalon?

Avalon still has a lot of underground roots even though it’s a big room. You’re still given musical freedom to play the set you want to play. A lot of music heads go there. But generally in the US or somewhere like China, I’d play a lot more vocal stuff, whereas in Europe I’d play something deeper. A festival for example, you’re going to try to bash out some anthems rather than try to take the audience on a journey. So yeah it really depends on where you are.

Could you identify three emerging DJs from India that you would recommend our readers at Magnetic to check out?

Kash Trivedi- He’s great! Always blown me away every time I’ve seen him play. He did this awesome bootleg of Nadia Ali’s “Pressure” and I must have used that track in every single set for the last six months.

Anish Sood- He just did a remix for me.

Anil Chawla- He has a kind of deeper rhythmic sound.

Could you tell us about your record label- Dex In The City? They’re so many DJs that are starting Indie record labels nowadays. Is this trend a wet dream for every producer?

I’ve always seen it more like a string to your bow, really. Nowadays everyone wants to have their own record label, podcast, and radio show. Things like that are good to have especially since so many people are getting into it. I have actually started a new record label called Ultraviolet which is more my style of music. With Ultraviolet, I want to be able to find artists who make similar kinds of sounds like myself, giving them an opportunity to step away from the big-room scene. The first release is going to be called, “Ultraviolet” a track that I produced.

How would you describe your career in five words or less – right from your residency at God’s Kitchen to the present?

Mental. Unbelievable. Stupid and wild.

Could you share your experiences while working with Andrew Bennet on Datfunk? What are some tips for producing you could share? Any collaborations coming up for the future?

I had this project that was half finished and I needed another producer’s opinion. I really liked Andrew’s music so I approached him. After that, we collaborated on the track via the Internet and that’s how it came to form. What’s interesting about working with him is that all of our collaborations have been online. I have never really sat in a studio with him.

For all non-dance music fanatics out there, how do you think one absorbs that progressive beat without considering it repetitive?

I try to insert vocals in certain places to kind of ease people into the music. When you’re eighteen years old, usually you’re never going to be into beat-driven music- most people that age want anthem, something heavy to get them going- Nicky Romero kind of stuff. However, when you’re twenty-five years old, people’s taste in music shits to the likes of Richie Hawtin. It really has a lot to do with how music affects the person’s emotions.

"Catch Paul Thomas this Saturday June 8th at Avalon. Here is an exclusive thirty minute mix from Paul to get those pulses racing."

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