Head-to-Head: Microphones - SM57 vs. Yeti Pro

Direct comparison of two high quality vocal recording microphones the Shure SM57 and Blue Yeti Pro.
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tyler@magneticmag.com
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Direct comparison of two high quality vocal recording microphones the Shure SM57 and Blue Yeti Pro.

Head-to-Head comparison: We test out the Shure SM57 and the Blue Yeti Pro to let you know some important specifications. 

First off I want to start by saying that both of these microphones have their place in professional recording, but this review will be from my personal experience using the two numerous times. 

Let's start with the basic differences for preference or use: 

  • SM57: $99 
  • Yeti Pro: $237
  • The Shure SM57 is a dynamic microphones, meaning that it does not need an external 48 volts to record audio, while the Yeti Pro is a condenser mic and will need the power to record successfully. 
  • The Yeti Pro is a USB microphone that can either go through a mic preamp or simply plug directly into the computer for quick on the go recordings. 
  • SM57 will need an external pre amp to get highest quality of sound recorded (which tacks on extra costs)

Shure SM57: This microphone is easily one of the industry standards for recording anything from vocals to guitars to even drums, it is extremely solid, versatile and records high quality audio. The SM57 boasts durability, which is completely true, it can be uses on almost anything (instrument wise) and still record professional sounds. It is a handheld microphone leaving it extremely mobile to be put on microphone stands or simply held for live performances. 

Blue Yeti Pro: This microphone is geared towards plugging directly into your computer USB port and recording straight from there. Doing so records a high quality sound (24bit/192kHz), but without a powerful mic preamp those sounds can distort quickly and recording levels can be hard to manage. The Yeti Pro boasts extreme versatility with the ability to switch recording patterns instantly, mute or record, and adjust the gain knob all built into the microphone itself. The microphone also comes with a built in stand that makes setup instant and recording quick and smooth. 

Conclusion: There is no right or wrong here, the microphones can be preferential in different situations for different purposes. If you are mobile recording, often out-of-studio without a mobile mic preamp, I would bring along the Yeti Pro. If you are recording instruments or vocals inside of a studio, I would personally use the SM57 in this instance. It all depends on what you are doing with the microphone; what you are recording, where you are recording, and how you want to record it. So in the end, both are powerful and affordable microphones with successful track records.