Industry Focus: Juan Carlos Baruch of Sacred Grounds

"For me, the best part is being in the business of making people happy."
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"For me, the best part is being in the business of making people happy."
Carlos Baruch

Los Angeles local Juan Carlos Baruch, also known in the scene as G-Dubbs, has been a major player in the LA House music community for decades. As a promoter and DJ, he's had his hand in building a movement in Southern California, founding Sacred Grounds in 1995, which is known for being one of the longest running House events on the west coast. Today he continues to push the underground into the future thanks to his commitment and passion for guiding those in search of a distinct groove on the dancefloor. 

We got the chance to ask Juan about his experience working in the industry, the key to being successful, and advice for anyone looking to get involved with dance music.

How did you start your career in the electronic music business?

I started out as a rave promoter back in the early 1990s in Los Angeles at the age of 16. From there I started collecting vinyl and playing records.

Did you start off as a fan of electronic music and then became involved on the business side, or did business bring you into the electronic music world?

Yes, I started off as a fan of electronic music and quickly became involved on the business side. My love for electronic music fueled my passion to learn the business fast. It helped that I was mentored by one of L.A’s first electronic music promoters. He taught me many lessons in how to network, guard my reputation, and always be the best at everything I do.

What does electronic music mean to you?

It means the world to me! I have a deep, profound love for house music in all its forms.

What is the best part of the business? 

For me, the best part is being in the business of making people happy. For a moment, a night, or a life-changing experience, knowing I’ve brought joy to someone’s life is a reward in itself

What are the biggest challenges? 

The politics in dance music.

As the EDM industry continues to grow, what do you think the secrets to longevity in this business will be? 

Keep an open mind, keep dancing, and always give opportunity to others who work hard for it.

Where do you see the most innovation in the EDM industry?

Innovation happens in all aspects. Many of the big breakthroughs in electronic music have come from those taking risks. Those who take the risks are the innovators. Innovation is what keeps the experience going.

What career advice would you recommend to someone just starting off?

Be patient, always remember timing is everything, and never make decisions based off ego.

What cities/regions do you think electronic dance music is best thriving? 

West Coast, Midwest, and East Coast. I recently visited the South, and there is a lot of work to do down there.

If you weren’t in the music biz, what would you be doing? 

I would probably be running an art department or design house. I not only have a business in the electronic music industry, I also own a business that specializes in concept design, multi-media, and other creative services.