PSA - Dancing Should Not be a Death Sentence

It's time to take a stand on this. Please share because #YourLifeMatters
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It's time to take a stand on this. Please share because #YourLifeMatters
Dancing Shouldn't Be A Death Sentence Cropped

After a festival season that is once again plagued with unnecessary tragedies, we thought it was time for us to make a public service announcement. I reached out to one of our favorite graphic artists, Kit Antone, to mock up the artwork and here we are. 

The three different pieces all subtly different but equally strong - pick one that you like and post it on your Facebook page, share it via Tumblr or Twitter or something, anything. People dying at festivals and nightclubs is not what this culture is about, and like I said in my previous OpEd, it's time for you to take responsibility for your actions. 

Dancing Shouldn't Be A Death Sentence

#YourLifeMatters

Dancing Shouldn't Be A Death Sentence

#YourLifeMatters

Dancing Shouldn't Be A Death Sentence

#YourLifeMatters

The scene should not be a police state, but and remains the target of scorn from local politicians and parents who have lost their children. This culture was founded on breaking down barriers, having fun, and celebrating life. It's a place where anyone and everyone could be under one roof and be cool, not a place to let your internal organs shut down because you decide to take three pills at once. Stop being idiots and start being present and thoughtful about your actions and the wake that they leave behind you. 

Below is the copy alone as well. Share the hell out of it, and educate and watch out for your friends, because if we don't start having one another's backs, there will be no more scene to come back to anymore. 

Electronic music events have always been about coming together and celebrating life. From the first raves to the current festival scene, the idea is still the same. With this celebration also comes a responsibility to yourself, your friends and even your family. Every time you party irresponsibly you put yourself at risk and everyone around you pays the price. Your one thoughtless action potentially devastates EVERYONE around you. It's time to take responsibility for your actions and party smart! All it takes is simple common sense: stay hydrated, use the buddy system, test your substance, know where it came from, don’t ingest too much and DON’T party in extreme heat.

Special thanks to Kit Antone, graphic designer extraordinaire, and hardcore music fanatic. 

Kit Antone (graphic designer/artist)

Kit Antone (graphic designer/artist)

"I remember the early Arts District warehouse party scene in 1993, as L.A. was healing from the riots in '92. Being a "raver" was not a popular thing to be in the '90s. You had parties that were religious institutions to misunderstood youth like myself such as, Does Your Mama Know (which recently celebrated its 25th anniversary). There have been friends I've lost due to consumption or drug abuse. Parties that were meant to unify and build communities were often shut down by police and demonized by local news outlets. Drugs and gang violence were often associated with early dance culture in Los Angeles, as well as other major cities. Most notably New York, San Francisco, Detroit, and Chicago. We were a generation of kids who were heavily influenced by the '70s and '80s, so we grew up with early rap, disco, funk, and psyche-rock. Our parents did drugs and did "The Hustle" at discotheques, and attended music festivals that we can only imagine being at. We also grew up in the Reagan era. We needed a place to belong because the pop music on MTV & the radio didn't speak to us. We needed a place that catered to our "sound." That bass! I found others that followed the same DJs, collectives and record labels, and we took road trips to party in neighboring cities like San Diego (soma) and San Fransisco (any desolate area from which bass was thumping). We hung out with drag queens, goth kids, backpack rap kids, graffiti heads, b-boys, b-girls, gangsters, old hippies - the guest list goes on. Nobody belonged anywhere. We just were there for the music." - Kit Antone