A lesson from a pro about why 'Escape From New York,' 'Gone Girl,' and '28 Weeks Later' are the best in Film music composition.

We're excited to present Steph Copeland to our readers today, as she's a horror music composer who's crafted music for some of today's scariest films, including Antisocial 1 and 2, Let Her Out, Bed of The Dead, Ejecta, and Bite. She's also composed music for major commercials including PanAm Games and BOSE. 

While she's now shifting her focus onto crafting pop-influenced music of her own, Copeland has shared with us her favorite horror film compositions and why they are truly unique standouts in the genre. 

We've also got a premiere of her stunning track "Little Boxes," which sees her working with Freek van Workum. The song is more uplifting than her horror-music background would suggest, but the resulting release is just as emotionally impacting and powerful as her other work. 

Check out everything below! 

John Carpenters' Escape from New York. The closing credits music is on my soundtrack to life and I'm a huge sucker for 80's synths. Coolest hero theme ever. 

Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross's Gone Girl soundtrack. The synths and crazy loops are gorgeous. Sometimes it's really simple, clean, and pretty, [and] then becomes this chaos of loops and cycles. I nerd out over score that crosses over into sound design territory or integrates "found sounds". 

Aliens by James Horner. It's the most terrifying score I've ever heard or can think of. And simply beautiful.

28 Days Later Theme and score by John Murphy. Unique because its an alt/rock soundtrack. Really memorable main title theme that perfectly embodies the sentiment of a sad and upsetting film. 

Planet of the Apes (1968) by Jerry Goldsmith. More sci-fi than horror but one of my all time favourites. The music is intensely expository because a lot of the film was without dialogue. One of the most exciting scores I've ever heard.

Fantastic Planet (La Planete Sauvage) (1973) music by Alain Goraguer. An animated sci-fi film from the 70's whose soundtrack is strange, trippy, haunting and really pretty. Even a little "porny" at times. I was obsessed with the film and soundtrack as a teenager and sampled the music in the first band I was in. 

Ravenous score by Michael Nyman & Damon Albarn. Really experimental and unique soundtrack that bravely went for it. Big fan of these bizarre, building loops that leave you some place odd. This score is all over the map and unpredictable. Stays with you. Love the excitement of it. 

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