Review: Paula Temple Releases Brutal and Beautiful Debut Album 'Edge Of Everything'

Paula Temple releases her debut album that finds a new way to express her brutal and powerful industrial techno.
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Paula Temple Edge Of Everything

Edge Of Everything Artwork

Paula Temple has released her debut album Edge Of Everything. She has been putting out music since 2002, but this is her first proper album. Known for her brutalistic blend of industrial, noise and techno, Temple channels that unique brand of modern techno into a 12-track album.

Edge Of Everything captures the type of powerful techno Temple is known for, but doesn’t spend an hour beating you over the head with it. It is both brutal and beautiful, blending these hard-hitting industrial records like the techno version of “Joshua And Goliath” with soft, ambient numbers like “Nicole.” It may seem like a copout to have two versions of the same song on the LP, but the slow version of “Joshua And Goliath” puts a deeper emphasis on the dark synths and leaves you stuck to your seat.

That darkness is felt throughout the album and isn’t just a way to express her music, but also channel emotion into the record. It leads the listener to a narrative she is trying to portray with this record. The song titles give a hint at the political themes that she is trying to express – notably climate change and the battle between democracy and authoritarian regimes.

Those themes really come through towards the end of the album with “Raging Earth,” “Cages” and “Post-Scarcity Anarchism.” Temple channels the most brutal and angry techno of the album on these three to send her message. She ends the album with “Dimension Jumping” that bridges the gap between the industrial thumping and a warbling melody that increasingly gets lost in itself as the song progresses.

It is often difficult to get a message across in music without words, but Temple has found a way to that, hopefully inspiring action on these key issues. The album channels the type of industrial techno she is known for, using darkness and anger as a tool, but also sprinkling beauty into the record. Functional industrial techno can be a means to an end with beats that just pummel your brain in. She finds ways to provide some substance to that canvas. 

Stream the record below and pick up a copy here.

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