How It Was Made: Shaded - Holla Atcha Boy [Dirtybird]

Shaded breaks down his latest EP on Dirtybird.
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Orange County might not be the place you instantly associate with electronic music, but the few artists that do call the region home are world-class talent. Such is SCI + TEC and Turbo superstar Shaded, who's latest Holla Atcha Boy EP on Dirtybird is classic Shaded funk with a touch of sleaze that he's become known for.

As a live artist, he blends DJing with production using various bits of hardware. We were curious about the process of the creation of his EP and how he implements live performances in the studio in a new How It Was Made feature.

Words and photos by Shaded

Shaded

Shaded

Roland VT-4: I love this thing so much that I almost use it on every record. A good example is my tune “Mad Stacks”. I did both the low pitch and high pitch vox on this thing, as well as the little vocoder harmony layers on top of the main vocal. This little joint is also great for getting random atmospheric noises and sweeps and has a solid autotune built-in which I really like. Definitely one of my faves and is built really solid.

Roland VT-4

Roland VT-4

Moog Sub Phatty: Gets a lot of love when it comes to my basslines and low end stabs. I like to run it with midi, make some tweaked out bassline riffs in Ableton midi, and then just start recording a loop while manipulating all the knobs in a jam session. I come up with a lot of happy accidents with this thing for sure. And like all Moog products, it's built super solid.

Moog Sub Phatty

Moog Sub Phatty

Moog Mother 32 semi-modular: This joint is super sick for getting pads and luscious sweeps. I usually start tweaking it while having some reverb and ensemble plugs on the channel strip in Ableton. I can really get some ethereal moments, and that’s my main use with this one. I would like to get another one and stack em, so I can get some dual action cooking. But yeah running these pads in unison with my basslines is something I like to do with this one.

Moog Mother 32

Moog Mother 32

Behringer Model D clone: For the price, this thing is insane. You can tell the difference from the original Moog Model D, but it's not extremely noticeable. I like to use this for basslines. A good recent example is my latest track “Holla Atcha Boy” in which I use it for the bass line. I just think it sounds fatter than any plugin clones and is super solid. I have had it for a year with no issues yet. For that classic Model D sound, this is the best bang for your buck.

Behringer Model D

Behringer Model D

Roland SH-01A: So this little guy packs a punch! I love it for writing minimal drums and tweaky percussion. It’s the next best thing to the original. I don’t usually pull this guy out if I am trying to get down a specific idea. This is used more for just hitting record and jamming to an idea that is already kinda sketched out. I get a lot of minimal trippy sounds out of this, and it's also really useful in my live sets.

Roland SH-01A

Roland SH-01A

Grab your copy of Holla Atcha Boy here

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